An Act of True Love

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November 1st, 2013 @ 20:51:56

A couple of days before I went to see Frozen with my parents and twin sister my Dad claimed that the cinemas had been told to bring the temperature of their air conditioning down by a few degrees to pull people in to the icy world Disney had created. We all thought he was joking.

I am SO glad I took a coat and scarf with me. It was a really cold night, that’s the only reason I did it. But turns out it was absolutely Baltic inside theatre screen 11 and none of us took any of our outer garments off the entire time. We should take my Dad at his word more often.

The film itself was marvelous. The researchers had done a lot of hard work (apparently visiting Wyoming, Quebec, Canada and Norway in order to properly understand and portray scenes of a winter nature) and that was evident. The thing that most impressed me was the snow on people’s clothes, especially when Kristoff first walks into the mountain shop.  Visual animators often talk about representing a world so that it’s believable rather than offering a realistic world to the viewer. But that snow was as real as my left thumb. Bravo.

The storyline itself was surprising. I was left wondering whether we would be forced to watch another ‘classic’ love triangle between Anna, Hans and Kristoff. After Twilight and the Hunger Games I feel this has been slightly overdone. Kristoff’s reaction when Anna tells him she is engaged to a man she has only just met is hilarious and broke the love triangle tension a bit – he obviously thought she was an absolute fruit loop.

But when the rock trolls pronounce that the only thing that will save Anna’s life is an act of true love I presumed we were on the one way road to feature film clichés again. As Kristoff ran hell-for-leather on a lake of ice to reach Anna before she froze I couldn’t help but not care. I presumed he would reach her, kiss her, kill Hans and generally save the day. The whole film had been building up to this point and I felt disappointed.

Thank goodness it never happened. Anna chooses to save her sister and sacrifice herself instead of feeling the pleasure of love’s first kiss. She kills herself in order to save another. And this act of true love is what ends up saving her life and saving her sister from bitter destruction as well. Disney portrayed love as an action, instead of a moment on the lips or a well choreographed catchy duet. The audience got their kiss at the end of the film as Kristoff and Anna lived happily ever after. But I left the cinema feeling hopeful that a reflection of true love had been represented pretty well for once.

‘Greater love has no one than this, that someone lay down his life for his friends’ John 15:13

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